Racing “The Crippler” in Colorado Springs

This ride report by Team CSP-SBI cycling ambassador Dave Theobald

After participating in a number of organized gravel rides this summer, I decided, on a lark, to race while the weather was still warm (September 30th). The event I chose was “The Crippler” — 67 miles from Canon City to Cripple Creek and back on gravel and 4WD roads. Arriving literally a minute before the start, I found myself uncomfortably at the center-front of the starting line. My immediate race strategy thus became how to sneakily progress (backwards) to the middle of the pack. I found my legs and rhythm and gratefully the top of the climb. After a fast descent with blind corners and big trucks, l finished fast and happy! Somehow, I officially have two results. I prefer my first result: 10th place, but am terrifically satisfied with my second: 20th place.

Dave Theobald is a Senior Scientist at Conservation Science Partners.  Learn more about his work:  https://www.csp-inc.org/about-us/core-science-staff/theobald-dave/

More on “The Crippler”:  https://www.myjourneyracing.com/the-crippler-2018.html

Catching the spirit of the Iron Horse

“the biking circle and community is great”.  –Howard Grotts, 2018 Iron Horse Men’s Champion

Durango, Colorado is a beautiful Western town.  This year’s 47th Annual Iron Horse Bicycle Classic celebrated Durango’s cycling heritage, and expanded the fun by weaving in new cycling events including BMX for the second straight year.  The atmosphere around cycling brings out such joy in people and the character of this place in an extraordinary way.  Cycling is a technology of contact, connection.  It’s simply amazing.  The Iron Horse is so fun it’s a pity it only happens once per year.

At the Iron Horse everyone gets involved somehow.  Like many people in attendance, over the weekend I was both participant and spectator.  On Saturday I raced the classic road cycling event from Durnago to Silverton, and on Sunday I watched the BMX action up close on main street and cheered the mountain bike racers as they passed through town and the Steamworks Brewery.  The festivities excel at community engagement so well the Iron Horse is in a league of its own, much like the San Juan mountains are perhaps the most spectacular range in the lower forty-eight.  It’s an event that matches the landscape!

There’s such a diversity of events there is something for everyone.  The road ride on Saturday is the most accessible event, and it’s on one of the most beautiful courses in the county.  There are races for women and men in all different age groups and categories.  The most popular road ride is the Citizen’s Tour to Silverton.  But don’t be fooled, even though the tour is not an official race, many of the participants are trying to set a personal best or even beat the Iron Horse train that departs downtown Durango at 7:15a.m. and steams up the canyons to Silverton.  I bumped into my friend Rose from Albuquerque on Sunday in Durango, and she did the Quarter Horse ride, which is a shorter road ride with less climbing that goes to Purgatory ski area halfway between Durango and Silverton.  Over the weekend, there is the La Strada La Plata Gravel Ride, MTB (mountain bike) race, BMX, Cruiser Criterium, Kids Race, bike parade and things beyond cycling–a running event, a triathlon, a Veterans Memorial Ceremony, and lots of vendors with art, food, and cycling offerings.  It’s incredibly fun.

I had a pretty good race by my standards.  I was sitting eight overall on the road as we headed over the final pass, Molas, for the final descent into the old mining town of Silverton.  Cycling legend Ned Overend was just a few minutes in front of me, and I basically had a front row seat to see him and other stars in racing action.  What a learning experience!  As I flew cautiously down the steep grade, two riders caught and passed me, and out sprinted me in the slightly uphill drag down Silverton’s main street to the finish line.  One of the riders I knew well, Ben Sontag, a mountain bike pro for Cliff Bar.  The other I wasn’t so sure of, but man can he race and is he fast!  As soon as we crossed the line conversations began, and I met the other rider, Todd Wells, three time winner of the Leadville 100 and USA Olympian.  He just retired and said this event kept him motivated to stay in shape.  I ended up in 10th place, but hey, when Todd Wells is just in front of you, is that so bad?  I was a happy finisher, like everyone!

Over the weekend, visitors soak up the local Colorado vibes and learn more about the many things we can do with bicycles.  And residents get to pinch themselves and be reminded how lucky they are to live in such a special community.  When people come together around bicycles more great things happen.  The cool thing about Durango is that having Olympians and cycling champions living next door is not really remarkable, it is just normal.  They represent the possibilities of human expressions through the bike life.  The event itself normalizes cycling.  The bike is the way to get around town.  The mainstream planning community is starting to respond to that.

I think it’s time we start referring to active transportation modes for what they are, our most basic and primary modes.  –Michael P. Sanderson, Professional Engineer (P.E.), “Leading the way to make active transportation safe, while improving health”, ITE Journal May 2018

I’ve grown up in a world where bicycling is seen as alternative or unconventional.  Planners and engineers today are working to make walking and cycling flow more naturally, like a mountain stream.  Every street in front of every house is a bike route.  Our street system connects us to where we want to go, our schools, work places, our friends’ houses, recreational assets, our business districts, health facilities.  Making the street system accessible and welcoming bicycles is key for healthier and sustainable lifeways.  The Colorado Department of Transportation has made big strides, putting bike lanes in on the main route through town, Highway 550.  This is where the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic begins, right in front of Durango High School.  They are trying to making it convenient for people to ride a bicycle everywhere we need to go.  It’s not perfect, though.  Vallecitos Road has a typical sign as you leave town that says “bike route ends” and the wide shoulder tapers down, but that doesn’t mean people stop bicycling there.  People that live in the country want to ride their bikes to town, too, and certainly town residents love to ride their bikes to the countryside.  When we change our paradigm and view cycling as conventional, we expect bicycles everywhere.  And at the Iron Horse it is like leaping into the future.  Softly, gently, joyfully…cycling dreams will come.

The entire community supports the Iron Horse, including the outstanding independent bookstore on Main Avenue, Mariah’s Bookshop

Credits and Further Reading:
Thanks to our team, sponsors and partners for getting us to the Iron Horse for the second straight year.  Go Team CSP-SBI!  https://bikeinitiative.org/sponsors-partners/
A special thanks to Sansai Studio for most of the great photos (the better ones!) in this post.
https://sansai.photoshelter.com/index
Visit the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic to sign up for 2019 and learn more about the history!
http://www.ironhorsebicycleclassic.com

Team CSP-SBI kits available

Southwest Bike Initiative invites you to join our team of cycling ambassadors, Team CSP-SBI, on this bike to work month 2018!  Clothing is available through Wednesday May 22 on our online store.  Take a look and enjoy the ride!  Sizing chart is here: Sizing  And here is the direct link to the store:  https://custom.zootsports.com/CSP  Items ordered ship about end of June.  More information on Team CSP-SBI is below!

Team CSP-SBI cycling ambassadors, leading by doing

Team CSP-SBI creates a welcoming and truly inclusive cycling community.  We are open to everyone.  We bring people from all backgrounds, ages, genders, abilities, disciplines and interests together through cycling.  We celebrate cycling as a way of leading by doing.  Cycling is an action we can take that makes a positive difference in our lives and communities.  It is healthy, practical, affordable, sustainable, low impact, and worlds of fun. I hope you, your family and your friends will consider joining us in sharing the joy of cycling and spreading the word!

unnamed-283 copy.jpg

More on Team CSP-SBI—

 

Southwest Bike Initiative (SBI), a sustainable transportation nonprofit in Albuquerque, NM, partners with Conservation Science Partners (CSP), an innovative conservation science nonprofit, to organize this global network of cyclists.  We use storytelling and social media such as Strava to share our cycling experiences and encourage others to discover more of the joys of cycling.  SBI provides educational tools and resources to help members build confidence and advocate for safer roads in our communities.  Most of all we take pleasure in cycling with friends! Team CSP-SBI grows the culture of cycling by expanding the community of practice.

Participation—

Your experience with Team CSP-SBI is what you make of it!  We have a dedicated race team in Albuquerque, NM but most of our members are non-competitive.  Cycling ambassadors can be on other clubs, too!  We strive to create unity through cycling and build a diverse network.  We participate in a wide range of cycling activities from daily commutes to community rides, events and competitions.  Our network increases learning and skill acquisition, and expands access to cycling by opening doors for people.  We help people get started and grow their cycling life.  Cycling is unlimited!

unnamed-285.jpgOur logo—

The American pronghorn is native to North America, and the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere.  Its top speed is about the same as that of a person on a road bike, around 55mph.  Pronghorn have a large heart, lungs and windpipe for sustained swift movement.  Pronghorn were more numerous than bison when the United States expanded West, with a population around 100 million.  Due to overhunting and habitat alterations such as fences, by the 1920’s there were only about 13,000 pronghorn left.  An ongoing conservation success story, their numbers are now approaching 1 million again.  They have large eyes, weigh 87 to 129 pounds, and walk just 30 minutes after birth.  Pronghorn are only found in North America, across the American West, in Baja and northern Mexico and in parts of the Great Plains.

About Team CSP-SBI technical cycling clothing—

Team CSP-SBI apparel are designed to optimize your cycling experience.  They are comfortable, stretchable, breathable, moisture wicking, they block sun and are soft and silky to the touch. The jerseys are a standard cycling jersey, with a full zip front for ease of wearing and for cooling down on hot days.  Three pockets in the back can carry food and anything else you want to bring on a ride.  The shorts have a pad to provide comfort and protection where the body rests on the bike seat.  The arm warmers and vest are great for cool morning starts, downhills, and protection in case of changes in weather.

Leadership–

Team CSP-SBI is led by Mark Aasmundstad, the founder and director of Southwest Bike Initiative.  Mark is a cycling instructor (LCI) with the League of American Bicyclists, and has trained as a commercial truck driver and geographer.  He’s focused on using planning, design and education for making transportation safer for everyone, growing sustainable communities and encouraging people to walk and bicycle more often.  Mark bicycles for every reason, and keeps discovering more reasons to ride.  We learn bicycling from others, and Team CSP-SBI is about building relationships and connecting people to opportunities to get into cycling and make it more rewarding.  Mark is an everyday cyclist, and a six-time State champion at the elite level, and a masters national hill climb champion.  When it comes to cycling he is a true amateur, one who participates for the love of it.

More about the kit—

Items ship in 4-6 weeks, so they arrive around the start of summertime!  Sizing chart is here: Squadra Size Chart. Sale of the kits cover the costs of production only. If you would like to contribute money to Southwest Bike Initiative to support our work, here’s the link:  DONATE
Donations are 100% tax deductible.  THANK YOU!!!
#biketoworkday

Artful living in the East Mountains

This year I realized how much I rely on riding, for my socializing even.  Half the people I know are the people I wave at and say hi to on my bicycle.  I miss being out there.”  Brud Grossman, “The Art of Simplicity”, East Mountain Living magazine, Fall/Winter Edition 2017/2018

The mountain communities east of Albuquerque are beautiful for cycling.  The Fall/Winter Edition of East Mountain Living magazine has a nice story on resident Brud Grossman, who makes himself at home there pedaling his bicycle.  Brud is one of the kindest people I’ve ever met, and we always say hi to each other when we’re out cycling.  He took some time off the bike while recovering from injuries last year, but he’s back out cycling daily.  I just saw him last Saturday when we stopped and joined him for a  break on South 14.

Cycling the roads in the East Mountain communities is fun.  If there’s one thing better than experiencing places by cycling, it is sharing the pleasure with lovely people.  As we leaned on the guardrail alongside the road on South 14, we talked about the small backroads we’ve explored that lead to neighborhoods with unexpected charm, stunning vistas, enchanting swaths of forest.  Brud uses cycling as proof of life.  Every year he makes it a goal to cycle up the Sandia Crest to the top at over 10,000 feet above sea level.  It reminds me of the David Budbill quote from the Sun Magazine.  “What I’ve put in the place of religion is the way I live my life now.”  Cycling has become part of Brud’s identity.  He is also a woodcarver, but at some point years ago his cycling practice became his main thing.

I look up to Brud.  Here’s a man who is following his own heart, and living his dream.   Living is a language for him, and the joy that comes from living he shares kindly.  The pleasure expressed through simple acts of living is a thing of beauty, and inspiring.

If you see Brud cycling, take time to say hello.  He’s as much a part of the East Mountain landscape as all the natural features.  I always learn something.  He’s seen so much through his cycling, and his words are loaded with life.  Thank you Brud. Keep on pedaling!

Not he is great who can alter matter, but he who can alter my state of mind.  –R.W. Emerson, “The American Scholar”

References:

View the magazine here:  https://www.eastmountaindirectory.com/LIVINGMAGAZINE/

Link to PDF of current issue:  https://indd.adobe.com/view/586fc0ac-3f67-4078-a478-5708f6ec0b7c

Related Facebook site:  https://www.facebook.com/EastMountainDirectory

2017, a year in cycling

2017, a year in cycling by cycling ambassador Stephen Wolfe

My wife Kyoko and I started out 2017 with a cycling adventure as part of our planned trip to New Zealand, a place neither of us had been. We spent a month in the country, and managed to take an electric bike tour of Wellington, our first time on E-Bikes. They were very heavy, and hard to maneuver, but I must admit they helped on the climb up Mount Victoria. The following week we journeyed to Christchurch, a city devastated by an earthquake in 2011. The experience was sobering, but the resourceful Kiwis are busy rebuilding. Christchurch was also the start of our cycling tour of the famous Otago Trail. The Otago Trail goes from near Mount Cook on the southern island, to near Dunedin, a major port. The trail is an abandoned rail line that served the gold and silver mines in the Otago region near the mountains. The line continues to utilize the original tunnels and trestle bridges and 145km has been rehabilitated for cycling travel with hard-pack gravel. Because the steam trains used for the ore cars were not very powerful, the average gradient is only 2%, making for an easy climb from East to West. However, taking the even easier choice, we started in Clyde, an old mining town, and rode mostly downhill to Middlemarch, spending the night at several other old station towns along the way, and even trying out the ice sport of curling in Naseby’s indoor rink. From Middlemarch the rail line is still active, so we took the train through some beautiful gorges to Dunedin. Overall, the people were very friendly, the food and coffee (the Kiwi’s only ever drink flat whites, and even McDonald’s and Burger King only had espresso machines for coffee) were great, and the scenery along the trail was unmatched.

http://www.otagocentralrailtrail.co.nz/about-our-trail/

Back in Japan, I took what was my second tour of the Shimanami Kaido, a route in Western Japan that is fast becoming a destination for cyclists from all over the world. Kyoko and I first rode the route in December of 2016, and were so struck with the beauty of the riding across six islands and connecting bridges over the Seto Inland Sea–from the largest island of Honshu to the smaller island of Shikoku–that we vowed to come back soon. My enthusiasm for the ride (and food) was contagious, I guess, as two of my friends expressed an interest, so in April I was down there again. The 75km route, although along local roads, is well-marked, and each of the six bridges  have dedicated cycling/pedestrian travelways, including the Kurushima Bridge, the world’s longest triple suspension bridge at 4.1km. The area is known for its citrus fruits and delicious fish, and the meals we had did not disappoint. We stopped halfway to stay at a Japanese inn and use the local hot springs to ease fatigue, and finished on the second day. My friends, not being dedicated cyclists, took public transport on the return, so I cycled on to another route in the region (more about that later).  Along the way we met cyclists from many different countries, who availed themselves of the many bicycle rental locations along the route.

http://www.go-shimanami.jp/global/english/bicycle/

Later in the spring we traveled to Kagoshima, a city on the southern-most main island of Kyushu. Kagoshima is one of the major cities on the island, is full of history, and features great Berkshire pork products. We took a day tour by rental cycles around Sakurajima, an active volcano across the bay from Kagoshima. The lap around the island was only around 35km, but there was ample evidence of previous eruptions everywhere. The volcano almost continuously spews ash.

May brought the Japanese edition of L’Eroica. The tour was plotted around 4 of the lakes at the foot of Mt. Fuji, and over 100 participants gathered with their vintage bikes to ride the course, which featured some wet, muddy sections. I rode the De Rosa I’ve had since I bought it new in 1980, and had a great time riding and talking with fellow vintage bike owners.

https://eroicajapan.cc/

I decided that for my 68th birthday I would climb Mt. Fuji as far as the paved road goes. The climb is about 24km with an average grade of 5% and 1,200m of ascent, which makes it quite similar to the Full Sandia Crest ride in the Albuquerque region (21.5km, 5%, and 1,150m), although the Fuji climb ends at 2,300m and Sandia peaks at 3,246m, making the altitude more of a factor in the latter. In September I also participated in a “fun ride” put on by the Bandai area in northern Japan to promote the region.  The 65km run was around and up Mt. Bandai, with a total of 1,400m of climbing, and lots of good food at the aid stations.

In October we went to Spain, the first time for my wife and over 40 years since I was last there (Franco was still in power at the time). Needless to say, Spain has changed dramatically since then, and the many areas we visited were vibrant, full of great food (ham, cheese, and wine), and nice people. During our time there we spent a week in Girona, the cycling capital of Spain and a place where the amenable winter weather and great cycling roads have led many pros to spend the off season. Our first day of riding was up to Olot for a ride down the converted rail line. The 60km ride featured lovely scenery of ancient volcanoes and farmland, and mostly downhill riding along the well-maintained trail. Our second day was a circular route to the Vall de Llemena, a quiet and unspoiled rural area near Girona. The following day we took our bikes on a train (the trains are well set-up to accommodate cycles) to a nearby village and toured six medieval villages. On the fourth day, the bike shop that arranged our self-guided tours had a group ride, which I joined for a 90km loop around the city. On the final day we rejoined the converted rail trail to ride from Girona to Sant Feliu de Guixols on the Mediterranean. It was very easy to see why Girona is so popular with cyclists. Cyclists were everywhere!

The last big tour of the year was with a friend who works at the same Japanese steel company where I used to work. We traveled down to Hiroshima, and from there took a ferry to the Kakishima Kaido, one of seven cycling routes established in the Shimanami region mentioned above. This island route featured vast oyster farms along the seacoast, and totaled about 90km. We over-nighted in Kure, a town where the famous Yamato battleship of WWII was built, and the next day we rode over 5 islands connected by bridges along a very rural and beautiful shoreline road, with a stop in a village that features houses from the Edo period of Japan, built over 150 years ago. A short ferry ride at the end took us back to the Shimanami Kaido, over four more islands, and ending in the shipbuilding town of Onomichi, a total of 110km.  We are looking forward to seeing how 2018 unfolds and though we have nothing definite planned, are sure it holds adventure.

Editor’s note: You can learn more about Stephen and meet more of our cycling ambassadors on the Team CSP-SBI members page:  https://swbikeinitiative.wordpress.com/team-csp-sbi/team-members/

A pint of the black stuff

A pint of the black stuff, by cycling ambassador Michael Ort

80.5 km distance
3:59:43 trip time
20.14 kph average speed
65 kph maximum speed
1400 m climbing
520 masl maximum elevation

My bike computer had these data on it, plus the usual blank entries for all the measurements that rely on a cadence counter or a heart rate monitor.  TMI, in my opinion.  But what do these data really show about my ride?  We moved to Dublin almost two weeks ago, and are in an apartment about 150 meters from Dublin Bay.  It feels a bit like the long-term care facility my folks lived in before they died – carpeted halls and doors off to each side, and we NEVER see who is in the other apartments.  I keep expecting to turn around and see a yellow submarine crossing from one apartment to the next.  The village of Sandymount has a real center to it, with a triangular grassy park full of kids on scooters and a few cafes and all the necessary stores (bike shop with skilled and cordial mechanics, a fish store, a grocery store, a few pubs, churches, etc.).  It is about 8 km as the crow flies to get to the edge of the city, several more by bike.  I tried a route I found on Google maps the other day, and it was very trafficky and not very pleasant.  Today, I tried a new route and it worked much better.  Still a few stops along the way out of town to figure out where I was, but much more pleasant.  Then the hills!  The Wicklow Mountains would be called hills anywhere in the west of the US, but they reach 2500-3000 feet above sea level.  I lived in County Wicklow a couple of years ago, and I hit the first familiar road, as far north as I rode in that year, about an hour into the ride.  That familiarity gives me some confidence that I can make this cycling work – I can get from my house to places I know are good to ride.  I wish it did not require a minimum of two hours to get a ride in that is not all in the city, though.

So what about those computer numbers?  The distance – I rode up over the pass to Glencree, then up to Sally Gap (at 500 masl, the highest pass with a  paved road in Ireland), down to the east and north to Enniskerry, then back up to Glencree and down into Dublin and home.  So what?  Well, once I got past the city and up into the hills, the traffic nearly disappeared.  The roads are old – much of what I was riding was the old Military Road, a road the English built into the hills after the 1798 Fenian Revolt, because Michael Dwyer and his band of United Irish guerillas would hang out up there and then swoop down to ambush the English military patrols.  The English finally grew tired of this and decided to build roads and garrisons up near where the “terrorists” were.  Funny how, since they won, the Irish are not thought of as terrorists.

I passed a memorial for an Irishman who was killed up in the bogs.  Captain Noel Lemass fought in the Easter Uprising in 1916, then in the Revolutionary War, and then joined the anti-Treaty side in the occupation of the Four Courts (he and his side were against the peace treaty that left Ulster with the UK – they had fought for one Ireland and did not want to give that idea up.  The Free Staters felt that the treaty was as good as they could get).

The road continues past blanket bogs where the Irish have harvested peat (called turf) for centuries.  They have narrow spades that cut into the turf and make a turf “log” about the size of two bricks end to end.  These are leaned against each other in tripods to dry, and then carried down from the mountain (or up from the back bog at my mother’s family’s farm) to be burned in the hearths of houses.  This went on for centuries, especially after Cromwell burned down what was left of the forests to tame the wild Irish and deny them hideouts in the forest.  The Irish would weave the branches together to make an impenetrable thicket, with the only ways in or out known to them.  Cromwell didn’t like that.  As I sit in my apartment writing this on a rainy evening, I can smell turf burning somewhere nearby.  My apartment has a plug-in “fireplace”.  I doubt it would put out any noticeable heat, if turned on.  Today, most turf cutting is banned by the EU to protect the bogs, which were severely depleted in the last few decades.

Continuing down the hill from the pass, I skirt above the Glencree barracks, once an English army base and now a well-touristed coffee shop and a Centre for Reconciliation of Conflicts.  Then up another pass toward Sally Gap, where four different roads cross in a high, broad, open, bog-filled valley.  At the crossroads, I choose left and head down – that is where I hit my maximum speed, in a pouring rain.

I go down for a while but the road has an abrupt 100-m-high rise to get around a granite knob above Lough Tay, the Guinness Lake.  The Guinness family owns a large estate around the lake and imported the white sand at the northern end so that the dark waters have a white cap, like a pint of the dark (or a pint of the black stuff), as Guinness is often called.  Then a steep plunge down to the farmlands and forests below.  I turn north toward Enniskerry along the back road, admiring the countryside at a pace that I just don’t feel like pushing today.  At Enniskerry, I remember a little connector road I rode once and use that to drop straight down to the road to Powerscourt waterfall.  A car coming up the road stops on the steepest part, flashing his lights to tell me to pass.  I find a place to pull over and wave him up – he has the right of way, and I don’t want to skid into him on the wet road.  Powerscourt was the estate of a wealthy family during the Protestant Ascendancy of the 1700s.  They had a remarkably beautiful tract of land, including the waterfall, and did well by it.  They collected plants from around the world and have a gorgeous garden that is now a park that one can visit, as well as a pretty sumptuous “town” house that is now a shopping mall off of Grafton St downtown.  Charles Stuart Parnell and the Land League pushed agrarian reform in the late 1800s and the Powerscourt family (the Wingfields) lost much of their local power and land (tenant farmers were able to buy the land they had been farming for generations).  The Powerscourt estate was attacked occasionally by Irish rebels, of course.  The little farms in the uplands were the Irish domain.

My route takes me up through these smaller farms for 8 km, back up toward Glencree, Near the top of the road, I pass an engraved granite slab that says “Liam Horner Olympic Cyclist The Last Prime”.  Horner was an Irish cyclist who went to the Olympics in 1968 and 1972.  Perhaps as important, he won the Tour of Ireland in 1972. That is a tough race, one for rouleurs who can climb an endless series of short steep hills on rough roads (ones that were a lot rougher and narrower in his day). Horner was known for attacking to win primes – he needed the money to eat.  In Ireland, they remember their cycling greats.  There is a plaque for Shay Elliott (first English-speaker to wear the yellow jersey, and wore the pink and red jerseys too) at the top of the Glenmalure hill along the Military Road. A couple kilometers past the Glencree turnoff, I stop to pay respect to Mr. Lemass and admire the view in a heavy mist.  The sheep don’t seem to mind the weather, although a few flee my two-wheeled presence.  Then a rainy descent back into the city, where I merge with the traffic and head home to my modern and efficient apartment in a multi-ethnic city where I hear many languages daily.  How many here know the stories of the hills?

Cycling makes a better life

Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”  –Leo Tolstoy

Although changing ourselves may be the hardest thing, a lot of people are putting their imaginations to work through cycling.  The positive effects of cycling are astounding.  62-year-old Geoff Whitington gained a new lease on life after taking on the challenge of doing the Ride London event in 2014.  Geoff had diabetes before he committed to training.  Now, three years later, he’s transformed his life by losing 98 pounds.  He’s diabetes-free.

Geoff was part of the “Fixing Challenge” in the UK, where families are encouraged to change their lives and share their stories to inspire others.  Geoff’s story “could be the story of millions” who are suffering from imbalanced eating and sedentary lifestyles.  The truth is when we try to change ourselves we get a lot of support from others.

We need to hear more of these good news stories.  And they go well beyond diabetes.  Cycling helps us improve our mental health, freedom and independence, and gives youth a chance to explore their world while discovering their inherent mobility powers.  Cycling can also give us a sense of fullness that comes with a purposeful life filled with meaning and joy.  Cycling helps us experience beauty and satisfaction in our everyday lives that we can share.  This is on top of all the social benefits such as savings on healthcare, freed up space, and creating more livable cities.

Here are links to Geoff’s story, and a few more.  Cycle on!
The Prudential RideLondon Fixing Challenge, Geoff’s story:
 https://www.prudentialridelondon.co.uk/events/100/entries/ballot/fixing-challenge/
An article in the NY Times today about veterans re-centering their lives with outdoor activities:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/02/us/finding-some-peace-after-war
Lael Wilcox on why she tackles long distance rides by herself:
http://www.bicycling.com/rides/why-i-choose-to-tackle-really-long-rides-by-myself

 

A view of Durango from Ft. Lewis College earlier this year at the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic