Healthy images of our City: Sustainable mobility with Gil Peñalosa

Imagination is more important than knowledge.  –Albert Einstein, quoted in “The Artist’s Way”

Join AARP New Mexico Wednesday, August 14 for an evening with Gil Peñalosa.  Engage your imagination in creating more verdant and healthy places to live, today and for future generations. Gil specializes in creating vibrant and healthy cities in a world that works for all.

https://www.gpenalosa.ca — Gil Peñalosa’s website
“Sidewalks are the most important infrastructure in any city, as walking is about more than just walking”. –Gil Peñalosa on sustainable mobility

https://local.aarp.org/nm/ — AARP New Mexico, this event’s host
“AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering Americans 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With nearly 38 million members and offices in every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, AARP works to strengthen communities and advocate for what matters most to families with a focus on health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment.”

http://www.abqciqlovia.org — Albuquerque’s Open Streets festival is Sunday, Oct 20, 2019
For more information check out their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/abqciqlovia

These NM Kids are ready to ride!

Grants, NM hosted a bike rodeo, safety and education course this summer!

It was made possible by Bike Santa Fe, New Mexico Brain Injury Advisory Council, LOOK FOR ME, Albuquerque Parks and Recreation, Future Foundations Family Center, Grants Public Schools, Cibola General Hospital, and Mt Taylor Dental, and dedicated community organizers!

More photos on https://www.facebook.com/CycleCibola/

To keep the body in good health is a duty. . . . Otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.  –Buddha, quoted in “The Artist’s Way” by Julia Cameron

Cycling as medicine

I was riding with Zach up Gutierrez Canyon and he said, “If cycling was a pill, everybody would be taking it.”  That’s a neat saying, but after pondering it for a while, I thought cycling is way more fun than taking a pill or vitamin. The benefits of cycling are proven medically effective, and the evidence keeps mounting.

The Specialized Foundation uses cycling as a tool for children to achieve academic, health and social success through their Riding for Focus program.  The Foundation partners with Stanford University to better understand the effects of cycling on the learning process in children.  It’s pretty incredible to see the positive results of cycling becoming more visible.

Play is a huge part of learning!  Cycling play promotes mental health and overall wellbeing.  As a team sport, it builds social connections and a sense of belonging.  When we do high intensity intervals on the bike, the mind focuses on exercise and nothing else.  The goal-oriented part of the brain gets more oxygen causing a focus-shift away from the other parts that might be stressed.  This exercise-focused goal-orientation leads to mental relaxation.  The following study by Global Cycling Network goes into the details more.  Basically the same kind of exercise doctors prescribe for heart patients is also good for our heads, and more.

The bottom line is the value produced by cycling is so positively impactful, we’ll have to create a new economic model to measure it.  The rewards to the individual and society are only just beginning to be understood.  The bicycle is releasing so much human potential!  Kudos to everyone making an effort to harness it more, including the people riding bicycles.

“Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.” –H.G. Wells

Further reading:
Kids are getting on bikes sooner and having more fun: https://bikeinitiative.org/2017/08/25/cycling-for-kids-strider-bikes-and-specialized-foundation/
Cycling as a national investment: https://bikeyogiblog.wordpress.com/2018/02/14/the-bicycle-is-americas-vehicle/
The Specialized Foundation: https://www.specializedfoundation.org

Cycling connects us with nature, too, which is good medicine

Bicycles at the Super Bowl

“With our goal being to get to a person as quickly as possible, these bikes are essential”.  –Atlanta’s Mobile Medic Response Team

“I’m not going to say I mastered it, but I did conquer it!” –ATL’s Mobile Medic Response Team

References:
Thanks to my fellow LCI’s in Bike Club for sharing this video.  Bike Club’s focus is building confident cyclists and great Tulsans through community engagement
http://www.bikeclubtulsa.com

Artful living in the East Mountains

This year I realized how much I rely on riding, for my socializing even.  Half the people I know are the people I wave at and say hi to on my bicycle.  I miss being out there.”  Brud Grossman, “The Art of Simplicity”, East Mountain Living magazine, Fall/Winter Edition 2017/2018

The mountain communities east of Albuquerque are beautiful for cycling.  The Fall/Winter Edition of East Mountain Living magazine has a nice story on resident Brud Grossman, who makes himself at home there pedaling his bicycle.  Brud is one of the kindest people I’ve ever met, and we always say hi to each other when we’re out cycling.  He took some time off the bike while recovering from injuries last year, but he’s back out cycling daily.  I just saw him last Saturday when we stopped and joined him for a  break on South 14.

Cycling the roads in the East Mountain communities is fun.  If there’s one thing better than experiencing places by cycling, it is sharing the pleasure with lovely people.  As we leaned on the guardrail alongside the road on South 14, we talked about the small backroads we’ve explored that lead to neighborhoods with unexpected charm, stunning vistas, enchanting swaths of forest.  Brud uses cycling as proof of life.  Every year he makes it a goal to cycle up the Sandia Crest to the top at over 10,000 feet above sea level.  It reminds me of the David Budbill quote from the Sun Magazine.  “What I’ve put in the place of religion is the way I live my life now.”  Cycling has become part of Brud’s identity.  He is also a woodcarver, but at some point years ago his cycling practice became his main thing.

I look up to Brud.  Here’s a man who is following his own heart, and living his dream.   Living is a language for him, and the joy that comes from living he shares kindly.  The pleasure expressed through simple acts of living is a thing of beauty, and inspiring.

If you see Brud cycling, take time to say hello.  He’s as much a part of the East Mountain landscape as all the natural features.  I always learn something.  He’s seen so much through his cycling, and his words are loaded with life.  Thank you Brud. Keep on pedaling!

Not he is great who can alter matter, but he who can alter my state of mind.  –R.W. Emerson, “The American Scholar”

References:

View the magazine here:  https://www.eastmountaindirectory.com/LIVINGMAGAZINE/

Link to PDF of current issue:  https://indd.adobe.com/view/586fc0ac-3f67-4078-a478-5708f6ec0b7c

Related Facebook site:  https://www.facebook.com/EastMountainDirectory

Cycling traditions in Albuquerque, NM

Pez Cycling published a feature article on Albuquerque cycling stalwart John Frey.  Over the 3+ years I’ve lived here I’ve met John many times while out cycling.  Even before I moved here I was aware of the US 40 kilometer time trial record he set in 1990 on one of the fastest courses in the world in Moriarty, NM.  John averaged nearly 32 mph!  And his record still stands.  Pez Cycling’s article helped me learn much more about the depth and detail of John’s accomplishments and the prominent cycling traditions here in Albuquerque.

John Frey, featured in Pez Cycling’s ‘Chrono Legend’ article linked at the end of this post

I grew up in Tucumcari, New Mexico and discovered cycling by visiting a small pro shop in Albuquerque, NM while attending the university and using the bike for transportation. I was intrigued by the specialized equipment and [the] fact that bicycles were raced like horses, even the cleats were nailed onto the shoe.  –John Frey on getting into cycle sport

Each time I’ve met John it has been an impromptu meeting on the bike, and every time has been memorable.  I first met John on the North Diversion Channel multi-use trail, while I was cruising with my friend Chris.  We stopped and said hello.  Another day I was climbing the Sandia Crest and rode up beside John and he started talking to me.  I matched his pace for a while and he told me how popular this climb was for cycling.  As I recall he got through a couple different subjects including steel bicycle frames before I spooled ahead.  The last time I met him we rode together north to Bernalillo and east through Placitas.

John Frey on the right, yielding to horses (photo by Mark Aasmundstad)

It was a fun ride.  John was on a team ride with Sandia Cycles, a bike shop in Albuquerque, and the group I was with bumped into them at the traffic circle on Tramway Road, a common meet-up spot for group rides.  We all decided to share the road together and headed to Bernalillo and then Placitas.  During the ride we came across a herd of horses.  We carefully chose our path around them.  On the same ride John led us through a series of backroads bypassing busier roads.  It was a new route for me, and a beautiful one.

John takes us past the wild horses, just before the road turns to dirt and climbs the Sandias

John is a lot like New Mexico.  His down-to-earth authenticity makes his monumental stature approachable, if you can keep pace with all the interesting stories.  On the Placitas ride he was looking after his teammates and keeping the herd of cyclists together.  As typical on a medium sized group ride, you ride side by side and change partners as the group rotates through.  I heard a lot of stories from John and his teammates about the cycling heritage and traditions here in Albuquerque and New Mexico.  John’s feats of speed on the bike did not surface.  You have to read the Pez Cycling article for that!  The links are at the end of this post.

After John and his team turned around I headed up the gravel road climbing the Sandias with Chris and Dean

Continue crazy for the bike, but enjoy anything outdoors in New Mexico altitude with my wife, Kelly, who is still on my wheel after plenty of rough road and bad weather! Advocate for cycling and health prevention to anyone, whenever possible.  –John Frey on what he’s up to now

Displaying IMG_20171215_113827759.jpg

Tramway road leading towards the Sandias is one of many assets making Albuquerque a great place to cycle

Links and references:

Pez Cycling talks to chrono legend John Frey, part 1

Pez Cycling talks to chrono legend John Frey, part 2

USA Cycling National Records

Movement is life, and more reasons to cycle to work

“Imagine if a team of scientists devised a drug which massively reduced people’s chances of developing cancer or heart disease, cutting their overall likelihood of dying early by 40%….That drug is already here, albeit administered in a slightly different way: it’s called cycling to work.”  —The Miracle Pill

“The benefits of physical activity are just so overwhelmingly large.”–Cycling to work means better health and a longer life.  Here’s how to get started.

On September 8 the Washington Post published an article on cycling to work in their Health & Science section.  It relates scientific evidence of cycling’s amazing benefits to the real life experiences of six bike commuters, making the benefits palpable.  One commuter, Carlos, says he’s saved $7000.  Another, Tricia, says cycling helps you see your city “in a way you’ve never seen it before”, and cycling to work clears her head.  “It’s exercise, there’s sunshine and it’s really cheap. It makes me happier.”  All of the commuters interviewed for the article “said they liked how biking built exercise into their day.”  It makes exercise come naturally and easily.

Not exercising is definitely risky.  Humans are designed to move.  But is cycling perceived to be safe?  Even though cycling crashes resulting in a death are relatively rare, Southwestern cities—Albuquerque, Tucson, Las Vegas, and Phoenix—led the nation in cycling crash rates in 2014-2015.  The growth boom of Southwestern cities after WWII produced a “transportation infrastructure focused almost exclusively on the private motor car” (from the FHWA doc. linked below). This is definitely a wake up call that we need to prioritize cyclist safety so the public feels more confident making healthy decisions.  Southwest Bike Initiative focuses on improving traffic safety and service for all travelers here in the Southwest US so citizens can share in the prosperity of cycling’s restorative effects.

One super cool thing about cycling to work is it shifts our perspective.  By changing behavior, changes in attitudes follow.  When I’m cycling I feel more connected and compassionate.  Our city’s purpose is to nurture our citizen’s collective well-being. We don’t want to be fit into a system that doesn’t make us fit or enhance our fitness.  Choosing independent movement through a self-powered vehicle like a bicycle makes us fitter, and is therefore very fitting.  It takes a new vision and education to positively change our social norms and habits, and leadership from the community.  It’s a matter of conscious choice and free will.    Carol says in the Washington Post article: “I think a lot of people have this idea that ‘real cyclists’ will look down on them if they only bike some of the time, or only for short distances, but there are no ‘real cyclists’; there are just people who put on their clothes and get on a bike.”  Cycling really is for everyone.

References:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/bike-blog/2017/sep/17/the-miracle-pill-how-cycling-could-save-the-nhs

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/cycling-to-work-means-better-health-and-a-longer-life-heres-how-to-get-started/2017/09/08/b48d13f2-72ed-11e7-9eac-d56bd5568db8_story.html?utm_term=.509d666c2b0e

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/bike-blog/2017/apr/20/its-good-to-hear-cycling-to-work-reduces-your-risk-of-dying-but-thats-not-why-i-do-it

Kenneth Burke—“people may be unfitted by being fit in an unfit fitness.” quoted in The Well-Tempered City by Jonathan F.P. Rose

https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/intersection/other_topics/fhwasa09027/resources/Design%20Guidance%20Accommodating%20Bicycle%20and%20Pedestrian%20Travel.pdf

Cycling for kids: Strider Bikes and Specialized Foundation

What will this do to our community?  –Wendell Berry quoting the Amish in The Sun Magazine, August 2017

Imagine if we made cycling accessible for everyone, from the moment we could walk to our last steps on this earth?  Strider Bikes and the Specialized Foundation are two companies hard at work making this dream possible.  Strider Bikes makes bicycles without pedals so people simply use their natural leg motion to propel the bike forward.  Riders learn the feeling of steering and balancing while gliding at moderate speeds.  Strider bikes are also called balance bikes.  They have handbrakes for stopping.  Strider Bikes makes a range of bicycles, beginning with one designed for children who are 18 months old.   Balance bikes are fun for all ages and all abilities.  I could see these helping senior cyclists.  It is like walking on a bicycle.  But it has that cycling magic, a gliding feel, like we are walking on air.

We believe it [cycling] has positive benefits far beyond what we currently understand, and we hope that our primary scientific research will lend itself to a broader discussion around how activities, like cycling, can help with all types of health-related issues.  –Mike Sinyard, Specialized Bicycles

Specialized bicycles are world class.  You see them underneath winners of the Tour de France.  The Specialized Foundation is developing specific applications for cycling as a treatment for ADHD in kids.  Mike Sinyard, Specialized’s Founder and CEO, has dealt with ADHD his whole life, and he noticed cycling alleviates symptoms.  A few years ago he decided to partner with researchers at Stanford to study the exact mechanisms of action that are helpful.  As part of the Foundation’s mission to “advance the understanding of how cycling can help improve the social, emotional, and physical wellbeing of children”, they have a grant program for schools who can apply for assistance supporting cycling for middle school aged kids, 11-14 years old.  Every cyclist I know expounds upon the benefits cycling introduces to their lives.  With scientific studies like this one, we are just beginning to understand what is possible using cycling as medicine.

For the lucky ones, cycling is a continuous journey that blooms throughout life.  To create more opportunity for more people to discover and enjoy the incredible powers of cycling, we have to improve traffic safety.  Here at Southwest Bike Initiative, we believe if we get safety right, automatic and beneficial effects are generated in our transportation and related systems, such as healthcare (where America spends 18% of our GDP!), creative economies, biodiversity, and better connected, more livable communities.  Cycling is such an appropriate technology for so many of our trips.  It makes our bodies feel whole again, well-suited and sufficient.  A safe traffic system is structural encouragement for active transportation.  We can feel free to use our independent mobility powers.

Cycling is a technological innovation delivering profound boosts to the entire community.  Let’s use it to our fullest capabilities!  And remember, the most important reason to cycle is fun.  People take to bicycles like birds take to the air.

References and credits:

All three photos are from Strider Bikes:  https://www.striderbikes.com/learn-to-ride

Story of Specialized Foundation:  https://www.specialized.com/us/en/specialized-foundation-about-us

Outside’s story on Specialized’s work, “Road bikes not ritalin, how cycling could help kids with adhd”:
https://www.outsideonline.com/2095101/road-bikes-not-ritalin-how-cycling-could-help-kids-adhd

Health care data from the World Health Org.,: http://apps.who.int/nha/database